Pluggd podcast community launched

Found via TechCrunch, this new podcast directory / social sharing of tags and stuff site is very cool. Incorporating many features that make it the best on the web. I would expect every other podcast directory to adapt many of the features that this is incoroporating, especially the web crawl feature.

Pluggd podcast community launched

Found via TechCrunch, this new podcast directory / social sharing of tags and stuff-kind-of-site is very cool. Incorporating many features that make it the best on the web. I would expect every other podcast directory to adapt many of the features that this is incoroporating, especially the web crawl feature. – Check it out – Pluggd Podcast Directory.

There are many cool social netwrok / sharing / tagging featured with this cool new directory, read more about it at TechCrunch.

TalkShoe podcasting

Very cool, glad someone else is doing this so I don’t have to…
TalkShoe is a podcasting service and directory that combines recorded conference calls with revenue sharing for show hosts.

Very cool, glad someone else is doing this so I don’t have to…

From Techcrunch

TalkShoe is a podcasting service and directory that combines recorded conference calls with revenue sharing for show hosts. It appears to be very simple to use and the community elements make me think this service could be successful. I can’t imagine many show hosts are going to make much money off of this, but the online video world has shown that when sharing is easy people will do it.

If the world really is changing to put user generated content at the center of media, some body’s going to find the right formula for audio. This looks like a move in the right direction.

Here’s how TalkShoe works. A Windows desktop client allows up to 25 people to participate in a conversation and chat behind the scenes. Calls are automatically recorded and entered into the site’s podcast directory. Show hosts receive money from the site’s ad revenues according to the number of their show’s listeners and for referring others to the service.

Google ads, ads in feeds and audio ads inserted in the podcasts themselves will all be used to monetize the site.

Conversations can be public or private and site visitors are encouraged to call in to live recordings underway. Participants can use telephone, Skype, Vonage or Yahoo to call in. The company says that SIP support is coming soon.

Finished podcasts are entered into the TalkShoe podcast directory where users can write reviews and leave comments. The site is set up to encourage subscription and scheduling of future episodes. There’s not a whole lot of activity on the site yet, but it looks like it could really catch on.

Featured podcasts so far include shows on Barry Bonds’ home run race, wine making at home, traveling in Italy and a debate between Mac and PC enthusiasts.

Many people say that podcasting is still too difficult for non-technical users. TalkShoe seems pretty simple. If there really are a large number of people interested in creating or listening to home-made audio content, this service could be a good way for them to do so.


Read the whole article with photos and comments at TechCrunch.

Waxxi is a New Kind of Podcast

we have been working to create a similar project, and I am glad to see that other people have had and are wokring on the same idea, usually that means it is a good one. I think that there is room in this space for several call in podcast channels, just as there is room for several talk shows in each radio market.

…where people can call in and participate (Frank Gruber has more). The kickoff podcast is with Naked Converstions authors Shel Israel and Robert Scoble, on May 20, 2006 at 10:30 AM PST. If you would like to participate, register on the Waxxi homepage and you will receive a toll free number to call and a participation code.

Well, we have been working to create a similar project, and I am glad to see that other people have had and are wokring on the same idea, usually that means it is a good one. I think that there is room in this space for several call in podcast channels, just as there is room for several talk shows in each radio market. TechCrunch / Michael Arrington likes the idea, so we will continue development and will keep tabs on the new podcast at waxxi as well…

From TechCrunch:

I think Tracy Sheridan’s Waxxi is a great idea: a scheduled podcast where people can call in and participate (Frank Gruber has more). The kickoff podcast is with Naked Converstions authors Shel Israel and Robert Scoble, on May 20, 2006 at 10:30 AM PST. If you would like to participate, register on the Waxxi homepage and you will receive a toll free number to call and a participation code. I do not know if there is a limit on the number of participants.

I have some unanswered questions about how the podcast will be handled. With a large number of participants anyone’s chance to actually talk much will be extremely limited. And I hope they will have some form of moderation to allow the host to keep control of the conversation (this is how public company earnings calls are handled – you press a button if you would like to ask a question and the host chooses you at the right time). A party line with dozens or hundreds of people would just be a mess. Also, Waxxi will have a simultaneous chat/im session running with the podcast. This is a great idea – and I hope that the transcript will be available along with the podcast (what we really need is a way to listen to the podcast with the IM archive rolling along at real time as well, but that would require the buidling of specific client software, something I don’t see suggested from the Waxxi site.

There are other experiments in this area as well. Skype just released a new product called Skypecasts, which allows moderated Skype calls with up to 100 participants. Although Skype does not have a record call feature, there are third party services that allow this (minus the simultaneous chat IM, though).

And Podserve has taken a different approach – allowing people to create feeds that a group of people, or anyone, can contribute to. They call it social podcasting.

Read the whole article and comments at TechCrunch – click here.

PlayStation Portable Gets Real Podcast Support

From Podcasting News:

Sony has introduced an update for the PlayStation Portable, version 2.70, that adds support for downloading podcasts to the device for playing offline. Previously, the PSP only supported streaming media content.

It appears that Sony is avoiding use of the term podcast, though. In their information, podcasts are called “RSS Channels.”

The update lets PSP users save audio podcasts from an RSS Channel (podcast feed) onto Memory Stick Duo media. Version 2.70 also adds support for Macromedia Flash Player 6 content.

The PSP now supports saving podcasts three ways:

* Select only 1 item to save – Select the item that you want to save, and then select [Save] in the options menu.
* Save items within a channel – Select the channel that contains the content you want to save, and then select [Save] in the options menu.
* Select multiple channels and save items within those channels – Select the channels, and then select [Save Multiple] in the options menu.

A sample podcast and tutorial is available at the PlayStation site.

The update is for customers who own PSP (PlayStation Portable) system model number PSP-1001 sold in North America. The update is a free download from the Playstation site.

App Streamlines Converting Video for Web, iPods, PSPs

App Streamlines Converting Video for Web, iPods, PSPs
From Podcasting news

Unfortunatley it appears thatt his app is made for the mac and no PC / windows version is currently available…

Digigami today announced it is shipping MoviesForMyPod/PSP 1.0, a batch movie converter that is designed to make it easy to convert a collection of QuickTime videos for delivery to Web, Video iPod 5G and/or Sony Playstation Portable (PSP) devices.

“Most Podcasters and internet sites (including video.google.com) are currently offering two distinct downloadable movie types in order to serve both the Video iPod and Sony Playstation Portable (PSP). Yet both devices utilizes the MPEG-4 SP file format.” said Digigami CTO, Gen Kiyooka. “What we have done is taken the sheer simplicity of our program and added the necessary magic in order to create one output MPEG-4 movie file which plays perfectly on both devices. So you can offer a single movie file on your web site which syncs and plays flawlessly on both devices. We continue to use Apple’s MPEG-4 encoder because in our tests, the encoder produced superior audio quality.”

MoviesForMyPod/PSP a Universal Mac OS X binary, and is also designed from the ground up to be multi-core aware, to take advantage of single, dual and quad-core CPUs, Intel or PowerPC.

MoviesForMyPod/PSP is designed with the video prosumer or professional in mind. According to Digigami, “Podcasters will enjoy the fact that QuickTime metadata is preserved when making podcast movies. And internet webmasters will find their job simplified by the automatic creation of PSP thumbnail files.”

System Requirements
MoviesForMyPod/PSP requires QuickTime 7.0.3 (or higher) and iTunes 6.x (or higher).
Intel, PowerPC G3, G4, or G5 Macintosh Computer with OS X Tiger (10.4 or higher)

Pricing and Availability
MoviesForMyPod/PSP is free to individuals, podcasters, students, educational users and small “sole proprietor, less than three (<3) employee” business. Corporations pay just $89.00 under an honor license system. The free version is offered without technical support, and the paid version includes Digigami technical support services.

Download here.

Podcasts Surpass Radio Stations Worldwide; Podcast Demand Growing Faster Than Supply

Podcasts Surpass Radio Stations Worldwide; Podcast Demand Growing Faster Than Supply – From Podcasting News

The number of podcasts managed by FeedBurner, a news feed service provider, now exceeds the total number of radio stations in the entire world, according to Rick Klau, FeedBurner’s VP of Business Development.

Podcasting is also one of the fastest growing technologies of all time. The number of podcasts feeds managed by FeedBurner is growing 15% per month. The number of subscribers, though, is growing even faster, at a rate of 20% per month.

According to Klau, “Podcasting is outpacing the speed of adoption of the last ‘most successful consumer product launch in history’.”

More Podcasts Than Radio Stations in the World

FeedBurner has been seeing 15% growth per month in the number of podcasts that are published:

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“FeedBurner recently surpassed a major milestone of 44,000 podcast feeds under management, which, according to the CIA World Factbook, exceeds the total number of radio stations worldwide,” notes Klau.

The Podcast Audience is Growing Faster Than the Podosphere

Recent reports of podcasting’s death appear to have been premature.

FeedBurner’s numbers show podcast circulation growing at bubble-blowing 20% per month. “Today, there are more than 1.6 million aggregate subscribers to FeedBurner-managed podcasts,” adds Klau, “and this number has more than doubled in the past six months.”

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Podcast Adoption Rate Makes it a Successful Technology

Podcasting’s adoption rate makes it a success, according to Klau. “Back in 2000, the DVD format, just 3 years old at the time, was declared the most successful product launch in consumer electronics history, outselling the VCR five to one. Using these statistics as a benchmark, in less than two years, the number of podcasts available online is tenfold that of DVD titles in nearly half the time.”

It’s Not All About iTunes

Some podcasters have started to focus their promotion efforts on iTunes, because of the popularity of Apple’s iPods. FeedBurner’s numbers, though, suggest that podcasters that focus exclusively on iTunes may be missing out on as much as half of their potential audience.

“Since we recently started tracking podcast downloads within feeds, we’ve also seen the ratio of downloads to subscribers average 2:1, suggesting a significant secondary market for podcast listenership beyond just the feed’s subscribers,” according to Klau. This confirms what many podcasters have noted, that they often have many more downloads than they do subscribers.

FeedBurner’s numbers reveal “a number of podcast directories generating a sizable amount of traffic” for podcasts,” notes Klau. This suggests that getting listed in top podcast directory sites can be a major source of listeners for podcasters.

And, while iTunes is the most popular podcast client, 43% of the subscribers to FeedBurner-managed podcasts use other podcast clients.

Klau’s comment’s on the expanding podcast universe are posted at Burning Questions, FeedBurner’s official weblog.

Podcasting News: Arbitron: 27 Million American Podcast Listeners; Podcast Users Young and Rich

Some think this is good for radio, however, I think it may be good for artists and consumers, I doubt radio will be seeing anything but declining advertising revenues with more and more people choosing to go commercial free…

Some think this is good for radio, however, I think it may be good for artists and consumers, I doubt radio will be seeing anything but declining advertising revenues with more and more people choosing to go commercial free…

From Podcasting News: Arbitron: 27 Million American Podcast Listeners; Podcast Users Young and Rich
Arbitron: 27 Million American Podcast Listeners; Podcast Users Young and Rich
April 14, 2006

Arbitron, a research firm serving the radio industry, has released a report that paints a rosy picture for the future of radio. According to Arbitron, “The proliferation of digital broadcast platforms such as Internet radio, satellite radio, HD and podcasting is a testament to the popularity of radio programming. ”

The report highlights user interest in new audio delivery platforms, such as satellite radio and podcasting, but suggests that the AM/FM audience remains strong. This contrasts with other recent reports that have suggested that podcasts and MP3 players are stealing radio’s audience.

According to the report, “Seventy-seven percent of Americans say they expect to listen to AM/FM radio as much as they do now despite increasing advancements in technology.” About a quarter of all Americans expect to listen to less radio, according to the report. For people that have listened to podcasts, 27% expect to listen to less radio, and among satellite radio users, 36% expect to listen to less radio.

Report Highlights:

* The weekly Internet radio audience has increased 50% over the last year.
* Nineteen percent of persons age 18-34 have listened to Internet radio in the last week.
* Satellite radio subscribers are twice as likely to live in 100K households
* Many people are still confused about what podcasts are.
* Podcasting attracts a relatively youthful audience. More than half of listeners are under 35.
* 11% of all Americans have listened to audio podcasts. That translates into approximately 27 million Americans that have tried podcasts.
* More than half of all teens own an iPod or other portable media player.

Podcast Highlights

According to Arbitron, 22% of Americans have heard of podcasting, and 11% have tried podcasts:

arbitron_podcast_chart.png

Podcasting is attracting an upper-income audience:

Arbitron recommends that advertisers start look at the new audio options that are available. People that are using podcasts, satellite and other new audio formats tend to be relatively young and affluent, a group of listeners appealing to advertisers.

“Consumers are quickly embracing radio’s digital platforms and this new research reveals that these advertising vehicles are becoming increasingly viable,” said Bill Rose, senior vice president, marketing, Arbitron.

Source: Arbitron (Acrobat file)

Software Converts DVD or Internet Video Content to iPod

Chalk this one up as good for consumers and likely to be a bump int he podcast road for content converting companies…

Software Converts DVD or Internet Video Content to iPod
By Matt O’Conner
From Xbiz

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — Software developer Roxio has released a program that enables the conversion of DVD and Internet video content for use on iPods and other portable devices using a PowerPC or Intel Mac.

Numerous adult studios have scrambled to make content available for iPod users since the release earlier this year of Apple’s Video iPod. Roxio intends to make it easier for users to convert content on their own with its Popcorn 2 program, thereby eliminating the need to pay for iPod-formatted content.

Popcorn 2 compresses and transfers DVD videos, disc images, menus and languages through a burn engine.

The software supports QuickTime’s MOV and AVI formats, DivX, MPEG2, MPEG-1, MPEG-4, DV and H.264. It can export videos to iPods, Sony’s PlayStation Portable, 3GP mobile phones, DivX handhelds and other video-enabled devices.

Users can also create “director’s cuts” by selecting certain scenes and screen shots as well as the order in which they play.

There are Open Source applications that will produce similar results, but Popcorn is more user friendly and has predefined settings, according to Tim Deal, an analyst with Technology Business Research.

Popcorn 2 requires a G4 or faster computer, Mac OS X 10.4 or later, QuickTime 7 or later, iTunes 6 or later and up to 15 GB of temporary hard disk space for video compression and translation.